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. >>> best medicine -- teens are using common cough medicines to get high, but tonight, a surprising decision about a possible solution. >>> and top secret -- what we now know was going on in the background in some of the most famous images of the civil rights era. famous images of the civil rights era. "nightly news" begins now. captions paid for by nbc-universal television >>> good evening. it's always been a huge gulf in american society and in our workforce, especially, what men and women are paid for the same work. tonight, we can report the numbers have moved. though the reason for it isn't good. figures from this year show women earned 83 cents on the dollar compared to what men earn. that's the highest number ever recorded. the bad news is the reason for it. the economy is in such crummy shape, a ton of men have been hard hit and many women in turn have prospered in this economy. still, in terms of women's income and earning power in the u.s., the number represents a victory, a milestone, and it's where we begin tonight with nbc's michelle kosinski. she's in miami beach for us tonight
to the 2,752 victims killed when terrorists hijacked four commercial planes that attacked the u.s. in lower manhattan 9/11 families gather at a park adjacent to ground zero. throughout the morning in shanksville, pennsylvania where united 93 flight crashed, michelle obama and laura bush will honor a ceremony to honor the passengers that fought back. plans to rebuild at ground zero are moving forward. the centerpiece, one world trade center, is expected to be completed by 2013, but with each construction step forward, there remains a connection to the past. steel beams pulled from the rubble were permanently installed this week at the entrance of the national september 11th memorial and museum slated to be finished in 2012. >> it is going to be a memorial that we will all be proud of and a memorial that will inspire people around the world. >> and always remind them never to forget. president obama also signed a probleming clamation making september 10th through 12th national days of prayer and remembrance, calling on americans also to set aside time to volunteer. amy. >> and now here's carl
in the days before the san bruno explosion, a pg&e spokesman told us this. >> we're researched phone records between september 1st and september 9th. we have no record of a call being made to report gas odor. >> leno said he doesn't believe pg&e and he has good reason. >> they're have a history of falsifying record when is it comes to the reporting of gas leaks. >> pg&e told us the same section of the gas line was deemed a high risk to fail and scheduled to be repaired in 2012. the day after the explosion, pg&e tested the section that runs through south san francisco and sound no leaks. mark tony heads the network that has been investigating for years and said san bruno is not the only high risk spot in the bay area. >> there other pipelines that are old, that have been identified as high risk for leaks and that are in the process of being replaced. >> reporter: documented filed with the puc show that the risk of failure of that section of this pipeline in south san francisco is "unacceptably high despite those repairs to that section of the pipeline." they are not scheduled to begin for two
with a member of the u.s. supreme court. justice steven breyer. >>> standing up to bullying in school. what most kids already know and what parents need to know about the problem. >>> and sudden death. a high school ball player's close call in the end zone, and what some are calling the miracle that saved his life. "nightly news" begins now. captions paid for by nbc-universal television >>> good evening. there was something about watching all those homes in california incinerated in that natural gas explosion and fire that made people think of their own homes, to see a neighborhood that was thriving just last week, gone today, makes you think twice about the dangers we all live with. in this case, the pipelines and gas mains that crisscross the country and bring energy to american homes. hundreds of thousands of miles of them passing under communities like san bruno, california. we start off just south of san francisco. miguel, good evening. >> reporter: good evening. tonight, the company that owns the ruptured line offered a bp-like fund. $100 million for families affected by the blast, but ton
a look at what used to be their neighborhood. >> fear, crying, laughter, shock. you have to laugh because -- >> denise shepherd's family lived on the block for 18 years. their house is gone. >> look, our house is gone, but not the hearth where we hung our christmas stockings. that gives us some peace, if you can call it that. >> pg&e admitted it took an hour and 47 minutes to shut the gas off after the rupture. they are looking into why. politicians want to know why gas pipelines, like the one in san bru bruno, went along the san andrees fault. >> he escaped in a car that is pliserred from the heat. he and his wife raised five kids in crestmoor. he wants to sift through the ashes. >> it courteous. map a couple diamonds laying in there somewhere of the. >> as he plapz to rebuild, he said offers of help are overwhelming. >> i get to a point where i realize how people are helping me. >> financial and emotional help so many people need. city, state and federal leaders here tonight urged everyone here to reach out for mental health services. representative jackie speer said p grkg&e will cover
. >> i still like it here. i just want us to be safer. >> reporter: you can't blame samuels for thinking her complex was, indeed, safer after a string of assaults earlier this summer, police arrested the man they say was responsible, antonio mouton. he now sits in jail, held there by $12 million bail. what's more, following the assaults, the complex's management increased the number of security guards working at the park regency. still, at around 6:00 last night, a 27-year-old woman called the sheriff's office to report she had been sexually assaulted. >> as she opened her door and entered her apartment, someone came in behind her and forced his way in. >> reporter: the contra costa sheriff's department believes this is not evidence that the park regency complex is unsafe. they do, after all, have security guards, a neighborhood watch, and security cameras. what this latest assault proves to them, though, is that no one, regardless of their circumstances should ever take their safety for granted. >> the bottom line is you can never lower your guard, and this type of incident can happen a
. >> reporter: he decided to keep those items away from us. why give up that privacy when that's one of the only things you have, when everything else has been taken away. >> this starts the healing process actually seeing it, though, now. my car is destroyed. >> reporter: how does it help in the healing process? >> well, it's there. it tells you that this is it. this is what you have. this is what happened. like i said for the people who lost lives, those are the people i -- my heart just bleeds for them. to go in there and see you lost material items, it's one thing, but to know that family members were lost, you can't place any kind of remorse in the scale that they might be feeling right now. >> reporter: the pellegrinis and other people who live within the blast zones will be allowed one more visit before a hazmat crew cleans up the area. then it will be time to rebuild. >> it's reality now, you know. >> reporter: in san bruno, bob redell, nbc bay area news. >>> nearly a week after the explosion and fire that leveled much of the neighborhood, the governor arrived to see the damage firsthand
the coast from us here in california. it was dinner time last night, about 6:15 in san bruno, california, the routine of a normal thursday in the neighborhood was shattered by an explosion so loud it was heard for miles. then came the geyser of flames shooting 300 feet in the air and then the noise. people near the blast zone understandably thought it was an earthquake, a nuclear explosion, perhaps a plane had gone down. turned out to be a natural gas line exploding and a fire that wasn't brought under control until just this afternoon. san bruno is a city of abo 30,000 people, give or take, just south of san francisco, just west of that city's airport, sfo. federal investigators have converged on the neighborhood where the gas main blew up. we begin our broadcast tonight from the scene. our own kristen welker and miguel almaguer are there for us. good evening. >> reporter: good evening, brian. the blast has already been called a state of emergency. this city reeling from an explosion so powerful it claimed lives and forever charred the landscape here. as day broke in a neighborhood not
correspondent savannah guthrie is here with us in our new york studios with more on this to start us off. >> reporter: as is customary in washington, colbert submitted prepared written remarking before his testimony, and they looked straightforward enough. when he sat down to testify, he went off script and into his comedy routine. and not everyone is laughing tonight. on capitol hill today, more evidence of why some americans think washington is a joke. the comedian stephen colbert, was billed as an expert witness on farm labor. and testified in character. >> congresswoman asked me to share my vast experience, spending one day as a migrant farm worker. i'm happy to use my celebrity to draw attention to this important complicated issue, and i certainly hope that my star power can bump this hearing all the way up to c-span1. >> reporter: one congressman initially asked him to leave. >> you run your show, we run the committee. but what do you say to that, stephen? >> reporter: but the testimony went on for several uncomfortable minutes. though not every member gave him undivided attention.
supplied us with copies of documents they received when they hired her in 2000. included is an employment application for the question, can you legally accept employment, the yes box was checked. >> we hired nikki through an employment agency and had relied on them obviously to verify that she was legal to work here. >> reporter: san yoen's attorney claims they received a letter from the social security administration in 2003 alerting them of the potential problem. she says there was a policy of don't ask, don't tell. for the nine years she worked for the whitmans. >> instead, nikki, the employee was told to quote, check on this, end quote. the employer, however, never asked her about this again. she alleges that she saw these letters after they were thrown in the trash. >> whitman maintain she was not aware of her san yoen's immigration status and when she was aware, she had no choice but to terminate her. allred plans to present evidence that proves whitman knew san yoen what's in fact an immigrant. >>> after being mauled by two dogs in a san jose neighborhood, police say a german sheph
to use it first. >>> then living on high-risk pipelines. the other bay area neighborhoods built on them. and -- >>> it's basically playing russian roulette with the customers. >> how pipeline problems could happen again. one man said pg&e's records are proof that customers should be worried. >> while the loss of lives is i am measurable, there are new numbers tone on the structural damage from that deadly explosion in san bruno, more than $37 million in damage, more than 30 million in private properties, 6 million in structures and sidewalks. 30 homes were destroyed and another ten had substantial damage. >> exactly one week after their neighbor erupted to flames and sorrow, the heartbreaking process of saying their final gooz b goodbyes to those who didn't survive begins. as they mourn, an eternal watchdog group is digging up eternal proof that pg&e are operating on dangerous pipeline. jean looks at those claims. jean? >> an attorney who has been litigating against pg&e after equipment failures says the devastation here should not be so widespread. the ntsb issued this document in 1992
officials will brief us in a couple of moments. we will go to them live. this is a look at the press conference that should begin any minute now. here is what we have learned so far. state and federal regulators have ranked the gas line that ruptured as high risk because it ran through a highly populated area we already knew one of the people who died in that blast was 44-year-old jacquelin greg who worked for the california public utilities commission. at the time of her death she was working on plans to upgrade another risky section of that same gas line 2 1/2 miles away. this new information raises several new questions of pg&e and federal regulators. we are working to get answers to those questions. we have new information tonight on the victims. investigators uncovered two more bodies in the rubble this afternoon. that brings the total number of people killed to six. nearly 60 others were injured and four are in critical condition tonight. the president sent his condolences today to the governor and we are waiting for this press conference to begin with federal regulators in san
, robbing her of $200 before getting away. >> it gives us a black eye in law enforcement. >> he says bad guys who pose as cops make it tougher for the good guys to do their job. >> when you have that little bit of doubt in people's mind, it makes it that much more difficult. >> while police beg to look for name tags or badges or any sort of identification, most people admit that's not what they do. >> i'm pretty nervous. i don't know if they like it if you ask for their badge or their name. >> honestly, they're probably wearing a badge, and if they look official, i probably wouldn't give it a second thought. even though i've heard of this happening before. >> he says posing as a cop is unusually easy to do. >> through the internet or mail order stuff, you probably could buy almost everything. >> what's unique in this case, the suspect's black suv, possibly a chevy tahoe, with flashing lights on the grille is almost identical to the real p.d.'s brand new undercover cars. now, the suspect is described as a black man in his 30s, bald and clean shaven. police say that there were likely dozen
in there. he was looking for us. once he discovered we were gone, i guess he went the other way and i thought i'd lost him. but fortunately i seen him pop up on the back of the street on the other side, we came up two opposite streets, so -- >> let's make the point, everybody in your home got out safely, and that's very good news. tell me about this house, though. this was your parents' house. i know that you grew up there and moved back in after your mom passed away. >> yes. >> had just remodelled it? >> right. >> what was it like to see it in flames? >> heart-wrenching. it really was. it was hard to watch. but the main thing is my intermediate family got out. the other things can be rebuilt and other things can be, you know, replaced, but you can't replace family members. >> where are you going to go from here, bob? where are you going to stay? >> oh, i got wonderful friends, wonderful friends that have offered homes for me to stay in, cars to drive. a friend of mine, bert, offered me a house to stay in and gave me a truck if i need it. we're staying with some wonderful friends, dav
or did he steal the idea from his harvard classmates. they settled for $65 million, now they'll tell us while they think they deserve more. now they'll tell us while they think they deserve more. monday, july 20, 2010. captions paid for by nbc-universal television >>> and good morning, everyone. welcome to "today" on a monday morning, i'm matt lauer. >> officials in bermuda are saying that they are still trying to assess the damage from hurricane igor. >> hurricane force winds and driving rain has led to extensive power outages. >> it looks pretty this morning. >>> also ahead, former president jimmy carter is in the house and we'll be speaking to him about a number of topics including the rise of the tea party, those two american hikers still being detained in iran and what he seeses a his own place in history. >>> on a different note, there are new problems for lindsay lohan. could the troubled actress be sent back to jail after she admitted that she failed a court ordered drug test. we'll have the latest on that story as well. >>> let's given with the damage caused by hurricane igor i
.n. the president of iran infuriates the u.s. delegation with his controversial comments about 9/11. this as two americans remain in his jail. this morning, the one hiker who was freed, sarah shourd, speaks out in her only live morning show interview. >>> and back behind bars, lindsay lohan faces a judge this morning after failing a drug test just three weeks out of rehab. and she could be headed right back to jail today, friday, and she could be headed right back to jail today, friday, september 24th, 2010. captions paid for by nbc-universal television >>> and good morning, everyone. welcome to "today" on a friday morning. i'm matt lauer. >> and i'm meredith vieira. this morning, residents in parts of wisconsin and minnesota are bracing for another round of flash floods. >> really heavy downpours over the last 24 hours or so and they've prompted officials to issue evacuations, even activate the national guard in some towns. we'll get al's forecast coming up in just a couple of minutes. >>> and the latest ton actor that appeared in the popular movie "the 40-year-old virgin" who's now been found
camera one man told us after searching for hours, he didn't find anything that he could keep. well, the people with red-tagged homes are facing the worst challenges. some work is still being done on the green-tagged homes where residents have been able to return. >> this lady here, the blast actually broke her window in the master bedroom and the soot carried throughout the house. >> reporter: serve pro is one of the countries pg&e is paying to go through these homes and remove the residue and scent left in these homes that could cause respiratory problems. these burned bits on the ground are pieces of paper, photos or chemicals that crews are picking up. public works is worried about what would happen to the ash and chemicals if weather forecasts are accurate and it actually rains this weekend. these bags filled with rocks are being placed around catch basins to filter out sediment and hazardous materials before they get washed into the bay. >> right here where we are, we're in the lowest location, so everything is going to run this way if it rains. >> reporter: now, the city of s
faith. >> right on. >> that's all for now. i'm ann curry. for all of us here at nbc news, i'm ann curry. for all of us here at nbc news, thank you for joining us. -- captions by vitac -- www.vitac.com until two years ago, when my dad transferred to istanbul. they settled in quickly. found their local deli. a few shortcuts. and a neighborhood hangout. but there's one thing they miss. their beloved hometown team. so i asked citi -- how many thankyou points it would take to give them something special. their old seats, 5 and 6, row c. [ male announcer ] citi thankyou points can be used for almost anything you choose. what's your story? citi can help you write it. >>> right now at 11:00, politics gets personal. for the second time in weeks, an oakland city council member is the victim of a crime. >>> plus, the investigation tonight after police discover bomb-making materials at a home in danville. >>> and the success of your children is priceless, but would you actually pay them to do well in school? the results of a school where kids earn up to $100 for good grades. the news starts r
. >> that was one of the most devastating moments. they tore us apart. three different cells. i screamed all night long. that was when it hit me that we were in prison. >> shourd says they were in iraq's culture and there was nothing on their hike to indicate they were crossing to iran. shourd's mother was in the audience and they talked about their bond. >> there was only one day that i just gave up. i didn't get out of bed, didn't eat. just cried. didn't speak to the guards. i had to pick myself up and keep going for my mom and for everyone else that loved me and for god. that's what makes you not give up. shourd said she hopes that her fiance and friend will be released as well and added that she has no animosity toward iran's president and hopes to meet with him this week while he's in new york. >>> the clean-up has begun in san bruno. crews spent the day removing the rubble left behind from three of the 35 homes destroyed. workers sprayed the homes with water to prevent dangerous materials from entering the air. >> it's difficult. i mean, it's two weeks after the event and now, we are going i
to explain that to us. >> reporter: the cpuc says yes pg&e will be asked to pass along any costs not covered by insurance, to you an me, the customer. that applies to cases of wildfires larger than an acre that burned a billing or home, and it would not apply in the case of this explosion. still, the idea is not going over well in the san bruno neighborhood as people here are just beginning to pick up the pieces after thursday's deadly explosion. the san bruno explosion, pg&e says the $992 million it has in insurance money will likely be enough to cover the cost of repair here, but the agency saw what happened in southern california during the '07 wildfires which ended up costing the utilities there $1 billion. >> pg&e, along with the southern california utilities, have requested that we be allowed to recover costs from wildfires that are not covered by insurance. >> reporter: but opponents say requiring the utilities to cover their own costs helps ensure they will be invested in inspecting and maintaining equipment to minimize risk. >> this is a matter of fundamental safety. >> they kicked
to the two other americans still jailed there? this morning, their mothers join us for a live interview. >>> and zapping the fat. two new devices promise to help give people better-looking bodies without needles, injections, or exercise. can they really work for you? we'll tell you today, wednesday, can they really work for you? we'll tell you today, wednesday, september 15th, 2010. captions paid for by nbc-universal television >>> and good morning. welcome to "today" on a wednesday morning. i'm matt lauer. >> and i'm meredith vieira. christine o'donnell virtually unknown just a few weeks ago, but this morning she's officially the gop's candidate for the senate seat vacated by joe biden. >> o'donnell is now the sixth tea party candidate to win a race this year. but this morning, some are saying her win could actually be a costly blow to the republican's hopes of reclaiming control of congress in november. why? we'll explain. and we'll talk to christine o'donnell about her victory, straight ahead. >>> also ahead, for the first time, we're hearing from the connecticut doctor who was the o
to report smelling gas. live team coverage tonight. >> first george joins us with elizabeth's tragic story. a mother killed and a daughter fighting to stay alive. george? >> reporter: cindy braun, her husband alan, and the sister are here at st. archbishandy arnold. they hope she will recover and return home soon. >> word spread quickly that one of their own was severely burned in last week's explosion in san bruno. >> when we found out our sandy was down there, this became a different story,. you know.kn i bebeingg affffected by it becau we're kind of close knit. >> sandy arnold was visiting her sister and mother, 81-year-old elizabeth torres. torres died. arnold, sher sisther sister cin brother arnold suffered third-degree burns over 60% of their bodies. >> when these things happen, you feel terrible, but you never think it will be somebody that you're so close to or that you know. >> sandy's husband was at his petaluma home and saw the news on tv and knew immediately that sandy was in the neighborhood. >> he had been trying to reach sandy on the cell phone, and he says, i can't get ahol
. that reporter is sharing her side of the story with us in a live interview, today, tuesday, side of the story with us in a live interview, today, tuesday, september 14, 2010. captions paid for by nbc-universal television >>> and welcome to "today" this tuesday morning, i'm meredith vieira. >> i'm carl quintanilla in for matt this morning. we are following breaking news out of iran. sarah shourd released from the prison where she's been held since last july. >> it comes after months of intense negotiations. an emotional morning for shourd's family as well as the families of the two men being detained. what led to this morning's sudden release and what will happen to the other two hikers? andrea mitchell will join us live from tehran. >>> the alarm wag more teenagers are getting high. it's called robo tripping. it involves common cough medicines and could soon force you to get a prescription just to buy them. we'll get details on that just ahead. >>> plus, a high school football player's heart races as he scores the game-wing touchdown. not from excitement, he was actually having a heart attack
before he's able to share it with us. live in south san jose, damien trujillo, nbc bay area news. >> this attack certainly serves as a reminder to serve extra precautions with trail running and here are some safety tips from police. be aware of your surroundings. don't wear head phones. vary your route. don't run the same trails every day. carry whistle with you, and whenever possible, jog with someone else. >> pg&e executives today acknowledge they have to rebuild trust with their customers following that explosion of that undergrad gas pipeline in san bruno. in a news conference, company leaders announced the release of a list of the company's 180s riskiest sessions of gas transmission lines. utility has also set up a hot line so customers can call and find out if their homes are within 500 feet of a line. pg&e says winning that customer confidence is vital. >> we believe that the best way to do that is to provide you all with the facts. get the facts out there and be transparent and be open. >> they might have about each one of these things. >> pg&e operates more than 6,000 mi
a back and forth yords deal. >> the judiciary appeared to use the release to flex its muscles, which highlights the deep rift in iran ejen amongst the conservatives. on friday the foreign ministry announced plans for her to be released on saturday, with the result of ahmadinejad's personal intervention and reflected his special viewpoint of this islamic republic of iran on the dignity of women. hours later the judiciary suddenly called off the whole release which was a very embarrassing rebuke to ahmadinejad. like i said, this really highlights these deep rifts and this struggle for the balance of power in iran right now. >> all right. nbc's ali arouzi, thank you very much. and now here's carl. >> jenna, thanks. >>> as the nation remembers the september 11th attacks on saturday protesters took to the streets, tongurning the day's m from reflection to outrage. mike taibbi has the story. >> reporter: they are by now familiar remembrance. >> adam -- >> reporter: the pause of the moments when the planes struck and the towers fell. the bells, the reading of the names of those lost. >> jam
to keep them away from the eastern u.s., but bermuda will probably be in the sites of igor and most likely julia won't affect anything. we can't rule out the eastern coast being affected by igor. we'll have more a little bit later. >> a lot to watch. thanks, al. >>> let's check some of the morning's other top stories. ann curry is at the news desk. good morning, ann. >> good morning, everybody. in the news over the weekend indications that the on again, off again iran release of american hiker sarah shourd is on again. on sunday the judiciary said she can be released on $500,000 bail after being held for more than a year. we're following developments this morning. where do things stand? >> reporter: good morning, ann. right now sarah shourd is still in custody. her lawyer says they are waiting for the $500,000 bail to be cleared and then he expects she will be released. now, under the conditions of bail, she is allowed to leave iran but her trial on charges of espionage is going forward. along with the trial of the two other u.s. hikers arrested with her in 2009. over the weekend u.s. offi
francis is in san bruno with the latest for us. hello, monty. >> the name of the person who filed this lawsuit is steve dare. his house was not damaged in the fire, but he was evacuated from his home for three days. mr. dare is suing pg&e and san mateo superior county court. he names himself and others similarly situated indicating this could become a class action lawsuit. the lawsuit was filed yesterday, it accuses pg&e for negligence for the explosion that killed seven people and destroyed 40 homes here on september 9th. the suit seeks to turn over the victim's fund set up by pg&e by a third party that would manage that money. it would also seek damages beyond that amount. pg&e is expected to turn over that list in its 100 most vulnerable sites, state senator leyland ye's office tells us the information is scheduled to be handed over 2:00 monday afternoon. >> the people and residents have a right to know where these pipes are so they can make a conscious decision, should i live here? >> pg&e has refused to turn over the list, arguing making the information public would be a thre
date. give us the confidence that we need, not only as a city but also as a resident, that the lines in san jose are well operated and well maintained and that if there was maintenance that needs to be done it gets done. >> reporter: lunch time brings huge crowds to restaurants on the northeast corner of the intersection. long-time businesses like the casa greek cafe say they are concerned about working near a risky pipeline. this he mr. to write a letter to pg&e, urging the power company to fix the pipeline now. >> people are going to hear about, this the more they hear about it the more they will be concerned. so we certainly need to have something done immediately. >> reporter: fellow business owner garcia agrees. he is opening up a new restaurant next moment and says this is news he did not want to hear. >> my reaction to that is not good, especially after what i saw in san bruno, because something like that, that would be be disastrous here. >> reporter: another pipeline in question is in milpitas near 237 and ranch drive. state of san jose tells me it will be meeting with pg&e
nguyen joins us to show up the first hundred-close ground video. to see it is just stunning. >> reporter: absolutely, jessica. jodi and the photographer were on the first crew on the ground. they had about 30 minutes to survey the scene firsthand. as jodi said, it's unlike she's ever seen in 20 years of reporting. >> as we walked down that street, it changed from a normal neighborhood to a nuclear zone. >> reporter: reporter jodi hernandez giving her account of what it looks like in this san bruno neighborhood 24 hours after the explosion that killed four people and injured 52 others. >> huge chunk of pipe. it was about 25 feet long. and 30 inches wide. it blew out of the ground and blasted at least 75 feet, landing right in the middle of the street. this huge piece of pipe. imagine the force that it took. and the people who lived right there, that crater is in their front yard. >> you're a reporter. in the other sense, you're a mother of two and you're a family and imagining what they all do, sit down for dinner. >> absolutely. i heard a story of a mom and a child that were killed in t
happened. hm. there could be some clues in all this. hey, this is the perfect chance to use my junior detective kit. magnifying glass, fingerprint powder, evidence bag, donuts. everything you need to solve a mystery. who do you want to be? shady spade, ace gumshoe or sure-clue holmes, detective? shady spade willa and sure-clue dooley are on the case. this is a complete waste of time. after all, we know who did it. do we? you said you don't think your alligator did this, and you're probably right. look, no teeth marks. since when has gus broken anything without his teeth? what? good job, dooley. you keep looking for more clues around here and i'll follow the drops of red paint. gladys, your problems are over. the boys and i have taken the situation into our own flippers and we have built you a brand-new whatever that thing was. you have papier-mâché? who needs it? we've made it out of something so much better: balloons! balloons make perfect hangy thingies. (popping) (crashing) um, we'll get back to you. blinky: hang on, bob! we're coming! (laughing) ♪ (gasping) lou, can you give m
. and they want to use these cameras to clear the air. so instead of the he said/she said, they can go straight to the video for the truth. in the next two months the oakland police department hopes to have a clip-on video camera. >> you don't even know it's on. it's actually very small and inobtrusive. >> reporter: the cost, $540,000, money earmarked years ago for survey lens equipment. after testing other cameras including some that are car mounted, oakland police decided on these. >> so far, what i've seen, the video is very clear, the audio's very good. >> reporter: they tested the new technology. he pulled this man over for expired registration. >> you just spilled your beer there. hand me the beer, too. >> reporter: turns out the man was also tested for driving under the influence. but officer lowe said there wasn't enough evidence and just gave him a citation for the expired tags. the driver says the cameras are great for accountability. >> that should be good. because legally, everybody would know what happened. you know? so that couldn't hurt nothing. >> reporter: police agree, hoping
't diminishing, it' groegs. >> lee cowan starting us off. thank you for that. as promised, news on another economic front, the number of people who lost their homes to foreclosure hit an all-time high last month. 95,000 homes were repossessed, taken back by the bank in foreclosure. that number is up a full 25% from last year. >>> now we turn to election politics. the latest reverberations from that stunning win in tuesday night's primary in delaware, where the tea party backed candidate christine o'donnell won the gop nomination in the race for a senate seat there. delaware is a small state, but what happened there is getting big attention. that would include the white house, where white house correspondent chuck todd is standing by tonight. chuck, good evening. >> reporter: good evening. despite the warning signs, all the surprise primary winners, like christine o'donnell, leaders from both parties, including folks at the white house, are struggling to figure out how this tea party movement has so successfully tapped into this angry and frustrated american voter. 24 hours after her stunni
's why one man told us today, that he is not letting any companies into his house until he has personally spoken to pg & e about them. another woman had an appointment with servepro and they didn't shoip. live, tracy grant, nbc bay area news. >> thanku, an e, & e documents sevealed there are fourunroe at hi ghri tsg or f aee wrehek or at nbca.ayre a line 132, the peipelin ieln s br or neliblbl.ew. line 1,13 south bay/sacramento delta. line 107o t livermore. line 108 runs to sacramento. >> emotional good by for a mother and daughter who died in the san bruno explosion. ♪ ♪ >> hundreds turned out for the funeral mass at a church in san francisco to honor jacqueline greg and her 13-year-old daughter. classes were chanced so students could attend. people spoke of their memories of the mother and daughter. >> who were jackie and genessa. jackie greg, beautiful mother, and loving wife. dead kate e dedicated, passional. strong, in fell gent. genessa, the epitome of innocence and love. a tour de force with character and personality. >> jacqueline's husband and eldest daughter were not home a
anything. >> meredith. >> beth holloway's attorney is with us. >> hey, meredith. >> this came as a total surprise to you as well, she never told you she was going down to peru? >> she had already been down there a couple days before i knew she was there. >> why wouldn't she tell you? you're her lawyer. >> i've been her lawyer for five years. she knows i'm very cautious. i think she knew if she asked me what i thought, she might not like the response or ir would ask her to think about it a little more. >> you would have advised her not to do it? >> i think she made up her mind to do it and she didn't want to hear anything to the contrary. >> what did she tell you she was going to do there? what was she after? >> she said she went to see joran, she didn't give me any of the substance of what she was going to talk about, the purpose or how she was going to accomplish this, she just wanted me to know that she was down there so i could get her back if something happened. >> this is a maximum security prison, how did she get in there with a dutch television crew? >> i have no idea. >> you don'
that leak that explosion happened. can you tell us a little more about that? >> reporter: okay, that's -- you heard the chief who could not confirm that. he referred some of these questions to pg and e and i have not seen a pg & e person availing themselves of any questions tonight. but there was a report earlier tonight that a witness had said something to that extent. now, we haven't talked to that particular person, but i know neighbors are talking about one person in particular who claimed he had smelled gas as long as days ago, perhaps even a week. we haven't confirmed that, and no one here in an official capacity has confirmed that. what you hear in the background now is red cross about to make some kind of announcement. but we'll let you know what they're saying. >> thank you very much, tom. apparently, according to chief dennis haage, he said it might be through tomorrow afternoon that they could do a full search of that area to see the extent of the damage, and if anybody else was injured or perhaps died in that fire, what we know so far is that the county coroner's office h
stood together and all of us here has watched it and seen it first hand. i want to first say that if anyone who is listening, if they want to help the victims of san bruno, please go to californiavolunteer.org. it is a website that is there to help. california is cutting red tape for victims and their families by the executive order that i signed earlier today. i want everybody to know that about two hours ago, president barack obama called me. he is concerned. he is watching from afar. he sends his prayers to the victims and he says thank you so much for the first responders. he's with us all the way. i think what's important for me also to add just in closing, is that we need answers. we need answers to the incident. the community of san bruno needs answers. the people of california need answers. we need to know why this happened, and we need to know how this happened. and we need to make sure that this never happens again. i'll repeat myself. i was just down there. it is still devastation and it must be fixed. we will continue to monitor this evening as the evening goes. w
but across the bay area. mr. hart also gave us an updated information just about the scene there. we learned that the crater is 167 by 26 feet wide. the depth is unknown. that is much larger than a previous estimate. the pipe itself was 28 feet long. that's the segment that blew out in the explosion. it apparently blew 100 feet. let's hear more of what mr. hart had to say just minutes ago. >> we do understand that the pipe was odorized which means it has an odor in it. that's part of our investigation to look into these allegations that we've heard that people were smelling this pipe and had reported smelling the pipe before this accident occurred. >> reporter: mr. hart right there was talking about allegations that people, residents who live near the explosion site made weeks before the explosion took place, that there was a smell of gas in the air. and he said that this pipe -- basically he said this is possible because this section of pipe was odorized or was mode to produce an odor if there was some kind of leak. he stopped short of saying thaed that he has verified those accounts. but t
with the information for us and kimberly terry have reaction from people in that neighborhood. but let's begin with monti. >> reporter: the documents show that the pipeline was at a high risk to fail but the company did nothing to repair it or replace it. as federal investigators begin the arduous task of figuring out what led to the deadly explosion that flattened this san bruno neighborhood on thursday, documents uncovered by the bay citizen, a nonprofit news organization, revealed just what pg & e knew about the pipeline and when the company knew it. going back as early as 2007, pg and ene officials expressed concerns about the aging pipeline installed 50 years earlier. in a report last year that recommended a $5 million repair, the company's own employees wrote, "if the replacement of this type did z. not occur, risk associated with this segment will not be reduced. that makes the risk of a failure at this location unacceptably high." federal investigators spept their first full day at the scene looking into what caused the pipe to rupture and explode. among their questions is should the p
says they will continue to be held in pretrial detention much the u.s. state department called the release. >> the release of sarah shourd demonstrates iranian authorities have the aity to resolve these cases if they choose. iranian authorities made the decision to release sarah shourd. we hope they will make the same decision regarding josh fattal and shane bauer as soon as possible. >> who paid the half million bail for shourd's release is unclear. apparently, it was wired to a bank in oman because of u.s. sanctions against iran. it is also not clear exactly when shourd and her relatives will return to the united states, presumably to the los angeles area where she grew up. one u.s. official is quoted asz saying she will be in oman for at least a day. stay with nbc bay area news for continuing coverage of this developing story. you can also find the latest updates on our website at nbcbayarea.com and you can sign up for breaking news alerts as well. >>> an intense wall of fire, like nothing they have ever seen. that's how the first firefighters on the scene of the san bruno e
joining us, we've been on early because of the giants game. >> seven painful days. a week ago tonight, we were bringing horrible images of the san bruno explosion and the fire that followed. breath taking stories of survival and heartbreaking stores of loss. those victims were honored. mourners filled st. cecilia's church to remember the life and love shared by jacqueline and janessa greg. mom and daughter died together last thursday. nbc's diane joiner joins us from san francisco. it's so sad. >> absolutely, jessica. one thing overwhelming with the love and support from the greg family, st. cecala's church was standing room only for the rosary and wake tonight. >> our father. >> our father, hallowed be thy name. >> no matter what, we were always there and always will be there for one another. god, thank you for jackie. >> i saw her that morning. and you would never think that -- would you never thinkñr that that was going to be the last time you would ever see someone. >> you know, home is supposed to be the place where you're safe. so she was making -- probably making dinner. janessa h
for us right now. steve? >> reporter: lisa, thanks. good evening. the blown section of the san bruno pipeline is here in washington, the ntsb is in the middle of its investigation. but now the pressure is on pg&e to alter its system immediately. in the hearing here in washington, up on capitol hill today, chris johns, the head of pg&e says he's already lowered the pressure of the natural gas in his pipelines that run through populated areas. he's inviting congress to require big gas lines to be moved out of residential neighborhoods. but a clash came on ougauto mat shutoff valves. senator barbara boxer literally sniffed at that. >> you would agree there would have been a shutoff valve, we would have averted the disaster. >> if there were a remote controlled shutoff valve in there, the gas flow would have stopped faster by the time our people got there. >> reporter: so the challenge is laid down. will pg&e make its very, very expensive upgrades and switch to automatic shutoff valves in all of these high-risk areas. about 3,600 miles of pipeline we're told. and do it immediately. the c
sheriff's department just briefing us on exactly how many people are going to need shelter for the night. at least at this point people have been showing up here at the bay hill shopping center throughout this evening, and they have been told over the past hour or so to please come here and register, and anybody who needs shelter for the night is being loaded aboard a bus on top of a hill nearby, and at last count, this officer just told us, this deputy, that there are about 50 people. that number is likely to rise as more and more people break up the conversations they're having around the shopping center and head over here to register tonight, but we'll keep you posted on that. >> okay, thank you, tom. let's go through the numbers, you heard them say at least 100 people, several hundred people displac displaced. 5,000 people without power in the area. about a three-quarter mile radius from the main area where the gas line ruptured. that has been evacuated, so those people in that area, as you heard the red cross spokesman say, even the people not affected by the fire will not be gettin
. the weather channel's jim cantore is there for us. jim, good morning. >> lester, good morning. yeah, the national weather service here, the bermuda weather service, says it's called to prepare for a direct hit. the center expected to come within 10 miles of bermuda. and with 100 mile wide hurricani force winds, a direct hit is unavailable in through here. you can already see the wave action behind me crashing into the rock cliffs through here. but they're preparing residents. that's the key, to take a major hit. something they haven't seen since fabian here. they're saying we're going to have roof damage, it's going to be widespread. we're going to have tree and power line damage. the royal navy is on standby. the big question is when are they going to be able to get in here? is it going to be monday afternoon? because it looks like conditions are going to be bad for 20, 30, 40 hours where no one will be able to leave their homes and no one will be out on the road. cruise ships plan to park here? no way. they're not even coming in. this certainly looks like it's going to be a very,
you. now the ntsb briefed us on the latest investigation details coming out of san bruno. the agency's vice chairman says the ruptured portion of the gas pipe will be shipped to washington tonight. that piece was put into a wooden crate this morning. they will inspect all three segments as they try to learn what caused the explosion. that examination will determine what the pipe suffered from. an hour ago the agency said there was no obvious preexplosion damage but they'll have to do more checking. ntsb is looking into whether seismic activity may have contributed to the breach of that pipe. >> we've seen the flames and the blow torch that reached 100 feet into the sky. now we have video of the first seconds after that massive gas explosion. a gas station surveillance camera caught the chaos and confusion that erupted as the fireball ignited and sent flames racing through a neighborhood. >> reporter: customers have no idea what is about to hit them. first a wooshing sound you can't hear on tape that turns their heads. >> you have to watch the debris first that flies. >> reporter: the
still trapped inside? and the search crews are using cadaver dogs to answer the question. these foundations that have burned have to cool off before the animals can be used in the search. but the good news is, jessica, no one around here has been reported missing. so, perhaps, there's some reason for optimism tonight. we want to give you some perspective of the disaster area. we're going to put up a little split screen here and there you have on the left side open your screen, that is a google level view of the crestmoore neighborhood before the explosion. look on the right side. isn't that extraordinary? that's a chopper image taken a couple of hours ago and it happened last night in a matter of seconds. people still incredulous around hey, as the describe the shaking that they felt. not once, but twice, according to many witnesses. and all of them thought they were in the midst of a very powerful earth wake. but as we know now, it was an enormous fire. >> now now that that shock of having the earth rumble beneath you has warn off the question that homeowners keep asking
. monty francis is in san bruno with the story for us. monty? >> this lawsuit is seeking class action status, right now only one homeowner is listed on this lawsuit. his attorney tells us, he's been contacted by at least a dozen other people who live in this neighborhood. >> steve dare lives in this house in san bruno, about a mile from the explosion site. his home was not damaged, but he was among those evacuated in the fire's wake. he's suing pg&e in san mateo superior court. the lawsuit seeks to change the way pg&e is managing its $100 million victim's fund. >> in an escrow account. it will no longer be part of pg&e's ability to determine who gets money, instead, it will be something for the court to decide with transparency. >> the lawsuit names dare and others as plaintiffs. it accuses pg&e for the explosion that killed four people and destroyed nearly 40 homes on september 9th. >> our estimated damages are 300 million to 500 million, depending how you look at, and what damages you include in this, obviously, the personal injury claims of themselves with the deaths are multiple m
, the safety checks come too late. kimberly tere joins us to continue the coverage. she has the story of a family with a red-tagged home. >> reporter: this family, along with the others who have the red-tagged homes, it's just a waiting game. and there are more questions than answers at this point. they've seen where their home once stood. it's now just rubble. that photo in a local paper. ricardo and his son ran for their lives thursday right after they heard the explosion and saw the fire with just the clothes on their back, they went out their backyard. they had to climb fences and went through neighbors' yards to escape the fast-moving flames. their house is just a couple of houses down from where the pipeline exploded. they say they are grateful to be alive. right now, their main concern is their home. they have already filed a claim with their insurance company and came to today's town hall meeting to find out what resources may be available to them and what pg&e's position is in regards to helping their family rebuild. >> well, we want to know what will happen after this, you k
elections, it could reach a boiling point. nbc's tracie potts joins us live now from capitol hill. good morning. >> reporter: it is clear the battle lines are drawn despite what we saw yesterday may have been a hint of compromise between republicans and the democratic party. republican john boehner hinting he might support president obama's plan to extend tax cuts only forethose who make up to $250,000. not for people who make more than that. but the republican party, other member, came back and made it very clear that they want these bush tax cuts extended for everyone, including the so-called wealthy, because they say those are the job creators in our society. jobs that right now are so desperately needed. interestingly, it's not a completely partisan fight, because at least three democrats agree that these cuts should be extended for everyone until the economy is on better footing. so we're looking at two deadlines coming up. first of all, the cuts expiring by the end of the year and, also, the effect of this election coming up in just a few weeks in november. lynn? >> absolutely. tr
protests in tehran, trying to exploited anger against the u.s. because of threats to burn the koran and the controversy over the proposed islamic cultural center near ground zero. president ahmadinejad, blames all this on what he calls a zionist conspiracy. >> translator: we believe there is a minority in the united states and they are zionists. they have no religion. they believe in no religion. >> there are jewish leaders working with muslim leaders to build the cultural center in new york city. there's no evidence of elite what you call zionists groups against it. fidel castro, your old friend, fi dell castro, criticized you for your comments about israel and -- >> translator: i need to talk, to speak. >> excuse me. >> translator: i think you should finish first, and then you should let me explain. >> speak. >> translator: what you see in islamic countries is what the people are against, that ugly behavior. they are not against the people of the united states, they are not against americans. >> we see no evidence that there is any such zionist con spour si. >> reporter: he was eq
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